Michigan Birds and Natural History

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Scientific Journal: Michigan Birds and Natural History

Michigan Birds and Natural History, peer-reviewed ornithology journal. Established in 1994, MBNH is Michigan Audubon’s peer-reviewed scientific journal, dedicated to ornithology and the natural history of Michigan. It is home to many long-running citizen science projects and surveys such as the Michigan Bird Survey (ongoing for nearly 70 years), the Michigan Christmas Bird Count, the Michigan Butterfly Survey, and the North American Migration Count, and the results of the annual Sandhill Crane census. The journal also includes the the actions of the Michigan Bird Records Committee.

Download

The following issues of MICHIGAN BIRDS and Natural History are available for download. All issues are in .PDF document format and may require a fast Internet connection due to file size (average 1MB).

Publications Index

Documents download in .PDF format.

What’s in the index?

Michigan Birds and Natural History: 1994 to Present – Complete sets are located at the Michigan Audubon office library and the Michigan State University library.

The Jack-Pine Warbler: 1927 to Present – A complete set is located at the University of Michigan Museum Library-Ornithology section, in addition to the Michigan Audubon office library which contains most volumes

Michigan Audubon Society Quarterly News Letter 1923-1926 – A complete set is located at the University of Michigan Museum Library-Ornithology section and the Michigan State University Library.

The Library of Michigan is another source for most of the above mentioned publications.

How to Use

An electronic index was created to aid in researching birds, natural history and related topics. Some key research words are author’s name, species name, census, survey, and banding. This index includes article titles to facilitate the search through “Find” on the Adobe Acrobat Reader toolbar. If any article title did not include for example a specific name, an identifying feature was added in [parenthesis] following the volume and number.

Please note: some bird species names have changed so to research in the older publications you will need to change your search word.

Audubon membership records, meeting minutes, book reviews, and announcements were not included.

About Michigan Audubon Publications

Written by John L. Trap

[2011. The Jack-Pine Warbler at the University of Michigan Biological Station. Michigan Birds and Natural History 18: 250-251]

The Jack Pine Warbler began life as the Michigan Audubon Society’s Quarterly Newsletter in 1923 before assuming its familiar name in 1927. It became a full-fledged quarterly journal in 1939 (Wiles 1976) and continued as such until 1989.

Following a one –year hiatus, the “JPW” was converted into a newsletter in 1991 (Campbell 1991) and morphed into a magazine format in 2007. Partly in response to the lack of an outlet for scientific articles on the birds of Michigan following the changed format of the JPW, Michigan Birds and Natural History was started in 1994.

Literature Cited:

Campbell, R. 1991. Editor’s note. Jack-Pine Warbler 68(6):4,23

Wiles, H. O. (comp.) 1976. Fifty-year index to the Jack-Pine Warbler, 1923-1972. Michigan Audubon Society, Kalamazoo.

Please note: Beginning with Volume 19, MBNH is a quarterly journal.

Submit Work

Michigan Birds and Natural History welcomes articles and short notes on appropriate topics. See past issues for guidance.

Submit electronic files with articles double-spaced to the editor along with all tables and figures. Files (WordPerfect and Microsoft Word preferred) should be labeled with title (or abbreviated title) and the author(s) name(s). Tables and figures should not be integrated into text. Large tables and charts should be tall rather than wide. Text should be transmitted in “Rich Text Format” (*.rtf). Figures can be sent in native format.

No abstract is necessary.

Please read the full MBNH Style Guidelines.

Photographs should be submitted digitally to the photo editor, Allen Chartier, with a copy to the Michigan Audubon office. Photos of rarities from each season are particularly sought and excellent photos of other Michigan species are also desired.

When an article is received, it will be sent out to be reviewed. Based on the reviews the article will be revised and accepted for publication (if revisions are primarily grammatical and not of a substantive nature), or returned to the author with suggestions for a re-write.

Articles should be sent electronically to: Heather Good